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dc.contributor.advisorGosner, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Justin K.
dc.creatorCampbell, Justin K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-10T19:09:56Z
dc.date.available2021-09-10T19:09:56Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, Justin K. (2021). Sovereignty Unbound: US Congressional Militarization of the US-Mexico, Mexico-Guatemala, and Guatemala-Mexico Borders (1971-2016) (Doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/661642
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines US militarized border security history through a multi-layered study of the US, Mexico, and Guatemala Congresses after 1986. By examining this historically and currently important case, I illuminate the drivers of border security policy on the US-Mexico border and in the region. The periodization focuses on the rise of border security into the largest armed federal entity outside of the military. I use two major historical research strategies: (1) an analysis of the personal papers of two members of Congress from Arizona who led to increase border security—US Senator Dennis DeConcini (1977-1995) and US Representative Jim Kolbe (1987-2007), and (2) the US, Mexico, and Guatemala Congressional Records after 1986. The congressional records document the process simultaneously as US border security increased on the US-Mexico border and then regionally expanded onto Mexico and Guatemala borders. This dissertation challenges the academic perspectives that presidents led the growth of US border security policy. My research shows members of the US Congress from border states led Congress to legislate and pressure multiple presidential administrations to increase militarized border security policies and enforcement on the southwest border, and then export that security to Mexico and Guatemala.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBorder Security
dc.subjectUS-Mexico Border
dc.titleSovereignty Unbound: US Congressional Militarization of the US-Mexico, Mexico-Guatemala, and Guatemala-Mexico Borders (1971-2016)
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Dissertation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.leveldoctoral
dc.contributor.committeememberFew, Martha
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Linda
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzález de Bustamante, Celeste
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-10T19:09:56Z


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