Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGonzales, Patrisia
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-14T21:53:00Z
dc.date.available2021-09-14T21:53:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-01
dc.identifier.citationGonzales, P. (2020). Water-womb-land cosmologic: Protocols for traditional ecological knowledge. Ecopsychology, 12(2), 84-90.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/eco.2019.0030
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/661648
dc.description.abstractAs the granddaughter of Kickapoo, Comanche, and Macehual peoples who migrated throughout the present-day United States and Mexico, I am most concerned with what happens as our traditional ecological knowledge changes when it is taken out of the spaces and relationships over time that we have developed with our lands, our waters, our medicines. I raise questions regarding cultural appropriation and the consequences that emerge when Indigenous knowledge becomes generalizable knowledge. Some of the key questions explored in this article include the following: What relationships surround the knowledge of the Original Peoples? Why is it that when traditional knowledge is taken out of its original relations newcomers learn the plant knowledge and then ask, "What money can I make from this knowledge?" How can we factor in the realities of colonization that result in the original peoples of a place becoming disconnected from traditional knowledge? To situate this discussion, I explore water knowledge from my perspective as a traditional birth attendant and traditional herbalist and an Indigenous scholar who teaches courses on Indigenous medicine. I discuss how the one signifier of water can have multiple existences, meanings, and forms. In contrast to deep knowledge that has been carried across time by Indigenous peoples, I call into question knowledge that is based on profit rather than on seeking a deep relationship with the environment that allows balanced relationships with the natural world-and the knowledge that those relationships create-to continue. Discussion also focuses on some key values and recommended protocols for traditional knowledge exchange, including (a) Acknowledgement, (b) Accountability, (c) Accessibility and Affordability, (d) Relatedness, and (e) Reciprocity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert Incen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2020, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectTraditional ecological knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous medicineen_US
dc.titleWater-Womb-Land Cosmologic: Protocols for Traditional Ecological Knowledgeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1942-9347
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Mexican Amer Studies, Grad Interdisciplinary Program Amer Indian Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Native Amer Res & Training Ctren_US
dc.identifier.journalEcopsychologyen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 18 May 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1089/eco.2019.0030
dc.source.journaltitleEcopsychology
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage84
dc.source.endpage90
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-18T00:00:00Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Water womb land52119 for open ...
Size:
279.1Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record