ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The mission of the Arizona Pest Management Center (APMC) is to support College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) faculty in their efforts to develop and deliver outstanding Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs that address the needs of Arizona’s citizens. This includes IPM programs serving agriculture, urban communities and natural areas.

QUESTIONS?

For information, please contact APMC at https://acis.cals.arizona.edu/about-us/arizona-pest-management-center.

Recent Submissions

  • Cotton Insecticide Use Guide: Knowing and Balancing Risks

    Bordini, Isadora; Fournier, A.; Naranjo, Steven E.; Pier, Naomi; Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02-02)
    Many factors must be considered when choosing an insecticide, such as cost, efficacy, risk of resistance, and safety to non-target organisms. This Cotton Insecticide Use Guide summarizes the diverse risks of insecticides used to control three pests, helping you make well informed pest management decisions.
  • Non-target Effects of Insecticides in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Department of Entomology, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-11-15)
    Handout reviewing 2023 cotton season trials, including a discussion on historical trends in insect control, Plinazolin and Sefina usage in Arizona cotton, ThryvOn cotton research, and early season insect control options. Handout was provided during the field tour during the 13th Annual Central Arizona Farmer Field Day held on November 15, 2023.
  • Anatomy of a Cotton Sweep for Pests and Predators

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Brown, Lydia; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-08-09)
    Regular sampling of cotton with a sweep net is one of the most powerful ways to monitor the density of key pests and natural enemies, facilitating critical decision-making. It is subject to individual variation, but standardization of sweeping technique can be accomplished so sweeps results of one pest manager match those of another pest manager.
  • Cotton Insect Control Trends: Where do we go from here?

    Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology and Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-04-20)
    The Arizona cotton IPM strategy has depended on the introduction and stewardship of multiple selective technologies like Bt cottons for lepidopteran control and selective insecticides that are specific to whiteflies or Lygus control. The system is entirely dependent on these technologies and their safety to natural enemies like predators that provide biological control of whiteflies and other pests. Recently, we introduced Predator Thresholds for determining the level of biological control provided by 6 groups of cotton predators. How to manage ThryvOn has become a very common question this year, now that it is completely commercialized and growers have made purchasing decisions outside of planted seed contracts.
  • Tips on How to Manage Lygus Efficiently in ThryvOn Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona, Entomology Department (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-07-07)
    ThryvOn cotton has been introduced to Arizona largely through seed contracts and other limited programs in 2021. The Arizona cotton IPM strategy depends on the introduction and stewardship of selective technologies like Bt cottons for lepidopteran control and selective insecticides for whitefly or Lygus control. The system also depends on their safety to natural enemies like predators that provide biological control of whiteflies and other pests. Recently, we introduced Predator Thresholds that guide insecticide application timing for whitefly control by determining the level of biological control provided by 6 groups of cotton predators.
  • Manejo fitosanitario de insectos de hábito chupador en algodonero

    Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology and Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03-23)
    The Arizona IPM strategy, in conclusion, was rooted in these innovations. 1) Science-based sampling and threshold plans; 2) A determined and intentional transition away from broad-spectrum insecticides and to selective technologies, including whitefly insect growth regulators and other fully selective insecticides and Carbine and Transform for Lygus control; 3) A strong integration of chemical and biological controls as first envisioned by the progenitors of IPM more than 60 years ago; and 4) The development and deployment of “Use Instructions” for natural enemy conservation and the “Predator Thresholds”.
  • Control Integral Quimico y Biologico en Algodon

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Naranjo, Steven E.; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology, Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03)
    El control biológico funciona. Funciona aún mejor cuando los controles químicos se seleccionan cuidadosamente para que se conserven los grupos de benéficos clave. La chinche ojona, escarabajo Collops, arañas cangrejo, larva de crisopa, chinche pirata y la mosca Drapetis son los benéficos claves el sistema del algodón. Pueden mantener bajo control la población de mosca blanca cuando sus números son lo suficientemente altos.
  • Making Whitefly & Predator Counts

    Vandervoet, Timothy F.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Brown, Lydia; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven E.; New Zealand Plant and Food Research; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01 r)
    Guidelines for sampling whiteflies and identifying predators critical in their management. Includes predator-prey tables that provide guidelines that aid in management decisions of whiteflies.
  • Whitefly Predator “Thresholds” in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C.; Pier, Naomi; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven E.; Vandervoet, Timothy F.; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS; New Zealand Plant and Food Research (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01 r)
    Natural enemy conservation is central to pest avoidance in cotton. The benefit of predators for controlling whiteflies should not be overlooked. Today’s growers can use selective technologies that conserve predators, which play a critical (& free) role in controlling whiteflies. We don’t normally think of predators as having “thresholds”, but new research identifies critical levels of predators that impact economic spray decisions for whiteflies.
  • In 7 Minutes or Less!

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Brown, Lydia; Castro, Gilberto; Naranjo, Steven E.
    In 7 minutes or less and just 7 steps, you can determine the size and structure of Bemisia tabaci populations in a cotton field. With this information, more precise and appropriate control decisions can be made.
  • Cotton Insecticide Use Guide: Knowing and Balancing Risks

    Bordini, Isadora; Fournier, A.; NARANJO, STEVEN E.; Pier, Naomi; Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2020-07-11)
    Many factors must be considered when choosing an insecticide, such as cost, efficacy, risk of resistance, and safety to non-target organisms. This Cotton Insecticide Use Guide summarizes the diverse risks of insecticides used to control three pests, helping you make well informed pest management decisions
  • Integrating Chemical & Biological Control in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Naranjo, Steven E.; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology & Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-07-15)
    Biological control works when chemical controls are carefully selected so that key predator groups are conserved. Big-eyed bugs, Collops beetles, crab spiders, lacewing larvae, minute pirate bugs and Drapetis flies are the key predators in the cotton system. They can effectively hold whiteflies in check when their numbers are high enough. Includes updated whitefly predator threshold tables.
  • Utilizando los Predadores en Algodón - FMC22

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS, ALARC (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-06)
    La guía del inspector acompañante para “Making Whitefly & Predator Counts”. Esta guía portátil proporciona instrucciones para el muestreo de mosca blanca y predators. La tablas proporcionan una guía para tomar decisiones sobre cuando fumigar para manejar eficazmente mosca blanca. Disponible tanto en inglés como en español.
  • Pale-Striped Flea Beetles in Young Cotton Stands

    Ellsworth, Peter C.; Brown, Lydia; University of Arizona Department of Entomology & Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-04)
    A guide to protecting young and emerging cotton from flea beetle damage and the factors to consider in determining control options.
  • ThryvOn™ Cotton, Frequently Asked Questions

    Ellsworth, Peter C.; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Entomology / Maricopa Agricultural Center (The University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-06-09)
    ThryvOn™ cotton is genetically engineered to resist injury by Frankliniella thrips and Lygus bugs. ThryvOn cotton is a major addition to the cotton IPM strategy. It will provide a new mode of action for diminishing the impacts of thrips and Lygus in cotton. This IPM Short should answer frequently asked questions of stakeholders and help growers and pest control advisors establish and discuss their expectations.
  • Cross-commodity Guidelines for Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Arizona

    Palumbo, John C.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-05)
    Arizona enjoys a sustained recovery from the devastating whitefly outbreaks of the early 1990's. This success is built on an IPM strategy that includes the use of selective and effective chemistry. Admire has been a key soil insecticide protecting vegetables and produce throughout Arizona and is the first member of a burgeoning class of chemistry known as the neonicotinoids. New members of this valuable, reduced-risk, class of chemistry are now available to agricultural producers, placing a burden on users of these compounds to adopt rational plans for sustaining their efficacy. This consensus document represents our best guess efforts to limit and share this chemistry among different agricultural interests. Our goal is to preserve the long-term efficacy of the neonicotinoids and protect growers' interests in sustainable and economical whitefly management. Through identification of crop communities (i.e., "multi-crop", "cotton-intensive", and "cotton/melon") common to Arizona agriculture, we have sculpted sensible plans of use that should allow access to this valuable chemistry for everyone, while protecting it from resistance.