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dc.contributor.authorRugg, A.L.
dc.contributor.authorRequist, M.R.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, B.W.
dc.contributor.authorSon, M.M.
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, A.
dc.contributor.authorLatt, L.D.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T20:25:06Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T20:25:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationRugg, A. L., Requist, M. R., Johnson, B. W., Son, M. M., Alvarez, A., & Latt, L. D. (2021). Mechanical Effects of Lag Screw Retightening in a Simulated Hindfoot Arthrodesis Model. Foot and Ankle Orthopaedics.
dc.identifier.issn2473-0114
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/24730114211015203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/662408
dc.description.abstractBackground: Nonunion following hindfoot arthrodesis may be caused by failure to maintain compression at the arthrodesis site. The ability of lag screws, commonly used in arthrodesis, to maintain compression in hindfoot bones has not been well characterized. The aim of this work was to quantify the stress relaxation response of hindfoot bone with initial and repeated compression with a lag screw. Methods: Ten sets of 25-mm-diameter bone cylinders were cut from the talus and calcaneus in fresh-thawed cadaveric feet. A load cell was compressed between cylinders with an 8.0-mm partially threaded cannulated lag screw simulating arthrodesis. For 7 sets, screws were tightened by 3 quarter-turns, rested for 3 minutes, retightened 1 quarter-turn, and rested for 30 minutes. Three sets served as controls in which screws were not retightened. Results: Maximum compression after initial screw tightening and retightening averaged 275 and 337 N (P =.07), respectively. Compression 3 minutes after initial screw tightening and retightening averaged 199 and 278 N (P =.027), respectively. The compression recorded 3 minutes after screw retightening was an average of 40% higher than that recorded 3 minutes after initial tightening. The average compression 30 minutes after screw retightening was 255 N, a compression loss of 25% from the average maximum compression after retightening. Eighty percent of this compression loss happened in an average of 5.5 minutes. Conclusion: Hindfoot bones exhibit compression loss over time during simulated arthrodesis. Compression maintenance in bone is improved with screw retightening. Further work is needed to understand the mechanism of action and determine optimum time for recompression. Clinical Relevance: Retightening lag screws before wound closure may improve compression at the arthrodesis site and thereby decrease the chance of nonunion. Level of Evidence: N/A, laboratory experiment. © The Author(s) 2021.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Inc.
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2021. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectankle
dc.subjectBone
dc.subjectfusion
dc.subjectnonunion
dc.subjectstress relaxation
dc.subjectsubtalar
dc.subjectviscoelasticity
dc.titleMechanical Effects of Lag Screw Retightening in a Simulated Hindfoot Arthrodesis Model
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Arizona College of Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Arizona
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Engineering, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalFoot and Ankle Orthopaedics
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleFoot and Ankle Orthopaedics
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-29T20:25:06Z


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Copyright © The Author(s) 2021. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author(s) 2021. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).