Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCharboneau, J.L.M.
dc.contributor.authorCronn, R.C.
dc.contributor.authorListon, A.
dc.contributor.authorWojciechowski, M.F.
dc.contributor.authorSanderson, M.J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T20:25:09Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T20:25:09Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationCharboneau, J. L. M., Cronn, R. C., Liston, A., Wojciechowski, M. F., & Sanderson, M. J. (2021). Plastome Structural Evolution and Homoplastic Inversions in Neo-Astragalus (Fabaceae). Genome Biology and Evolution.
dc.identifier.issn1759-6653
dc.identifier.pmid34534296
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gbe/evab215
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/662412
dc.description.abstractThe plastid genomes of photosynthetic green plants have largely maintained conserved gene content and order as well as structure over hundreds of millions of years of evolution. Several plant lineages, however, have departed from this conservation and contain many plastome structural rearrangements, which have been associated with an abundance of repeated sequences both overall and near rearrangement endpoints. We sequenced the plastomes of 25 taxa of Astragalus L. (Fabaceae), a large genus in the inverted repeat-lacking clade of legumes, to gain a greater understanding of the connection between repeats and plastome inversions. We found plastome repeat structure has a strong phylogenetic signal among these closely related taxa mostly in the New World clade of Astragalus called Neo-Astragalus. Taxa without inversions also do not differ substantially in their overall repeat structure from four taxa each with one large-scale inversion. For two taxa with inversion endpoints between the same pairs of genes, differences in their exact endpoints indicate the inversions occurred independently. Our proposed mechanism for inversion formation suggests the short inverted repeats now found near the endpoints of the four inversions may be there as a result of these inversions rather than their cause. The longer inverted repeats now near endpoints may have allowed the inversions first mediated by shorter microhomologous sequences to propagate, something that should be considered in explaining how any plastome rearrangement becomes fixed regardless of the mechanism of initial formation. © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNLM (Medline)
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectchloroplast
dc.subjectinverted repeat-lacking clade
dc.subjectlegumes
dc.subjectmicrohomology-mediated rearrangements
dc.subjectplastid genome
dc.titlePlastome Structural Evolution and Homoplastic Inversions in Neo-Astragalus (Fabaceae)
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalGenome biology and evolution
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleGenome biology and evolution
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-29T20:25:09Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
evab215.pdf
Size:
1.336Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).