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dc.contributor.authorAchtman, M.
dc.contributor.authorVan den Broeck, F.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, K.K.
dc.contributor.authorLemey, P.
dc.contributor.authorParker, C.T.
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Z.
dc.contributor.authorATCC14028s Study, Group
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T20:25:19Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T20:25:19Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationAchtman, M., Van den Broeck, F., Cooper, K. K., Lemey, P., Parker, C. T., Zhou, Z., & ATCC14028s Study Group. (2021). Genomic population structure associated with repeated escape of Salmonella enterica ATCC14028s from the laboratory into nature. PLoS Genetics.
dc.identifier.issn1553-7404
dc.identifier.pmid34570761
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pgen.1009820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/662428
dc.description.abstractSalmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC14028s is commercially available from multiple national type culture collections, and has been widely used since 1960 for quality control of growth media and experiments on fitness ("laboratory evolution"). ATCC14028s has been implicated in multiple cross-contaminations in the laboratory, and has also caused multiple laboratory infections and one known attempt at bioterrorism. According to hierarchical clustering of 3002 core gene sequences, ATCC14028s belongs to HierCC cluster HC20_373 in which most internal branch lengths are only one to three SNPs long. Many natural Typhimurium isolates from humans, domesticated animals and the environment also belong to HC20_373, and their core genomes are almost indistinguishable from those of laboratory strains. These natural isolates have infected humans in Ireland and Taiwan for decades, and are common in the British Isles as well as the Americas. The isolation history of some of the natural isolates confirms the conclusion that they do not represent recent contamination by the laboratory strain, and 10% carry plasmids or bacteriophages which have been acquired in nature by HGT from unrelated bacteria. We propose that ATCC14028s has repeatedly escaped from the laboratory environment into nature via laboratory accidents or infections, but the escaped micro-lineages have only a limited life span. As a result, there is a genetic gap separating HC20_373 from its closest natural relatives due to a divergence between them in the late 19th century followed by repeated extinction events of escaped HC20_373.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNLM (Medline)
dc.rightsThis is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.titleGenomic population structure associated with repeated escape of Salmonella enterica ATCC14028s from the laboratory into nature
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalPLoS genetics
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitlePLoS genetics
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-29T20:25:19Z


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This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.