Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBybee, J.
dc.contributor.authorRoundy, B.A.
dc.contributor.authorYoung, K.R.
dc.contributor.authorHulet, A.
dc.contributor.authorRoundy, D.B.
dc.contributor.authorCrook, L.
dc.contributor.authorAanderud, Z.
dc.contributor.authorEggett, D.L.
dc.contributor.authorCline, N.L.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-07T19:54:46Z
dc.date.available2022-01-07T19:54:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationBybee, J., Roundy, B. A., Young, K. R., Hulet, A., Roundy, D. B., Crook, L., Aanderud, Z., Eggett, D. L., & Cline, N. L. (2016). Vegetation Response to Piñon and Juniper Tree Shredding∗. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 69(3), 224–234.
dc.identifier.issn1550-7424
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rama.2016.01.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/662793
dc.description.abstractPiñon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) expansion and infilling in sagebrush (Artemisia L.) steppe communities can lead to high-severity fire and annual weed dominance. To determine vegetation response to fuel reduction by tree mastication (shredding) or seeding and then shredding, we measured cover for shrub and herbaceous functional groups on shredded and adjacent untreated areas on 44 sites in Utah. We used mixed model analysis of covariance to determine significant differences among ecological site type (expansion and tree climax) and treatments across a range of pretreatment tree cover as the covariate. Although expansion and tree climax sites differed in cover values for some functional groups, decreasing understory cover with increasing tree cover and increased understory cover with tree reduction was similar for both ecological site types. Shrub cover decreased by 50% when tree cover exceeded 20%. Shredding trees at ≤ 20% cover maintained a mixed shrub (18.6% cover)-perennial herbaceous (17.6% cover) community. Perennial herbaceous cover decreased by 50% when tree cover exceeded 40% but exceeded untreated cover by 11% (20.1% cover) when trees were shredded at 15-90% tree cover. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) cover also increased after tree shredding or seeding and then shredding but was much less dominant (< 10% cover) where perennial herbaceous cover exceeded 42%. Sites with high cheatgrass cover on untreated plots had high cheatgrass cover on shredded and seeded-shredded plots. Seeding and then shredding decreased cheatgrass cover compared with shredding alone when implemented at tree cover ≥ 50%. Vegetation responses to shredding on expansion sites were generally similar to those for tree cutting treatments in the SageSTEP study. Shredding or seeding and then shredding should facilitate wildfire suppression, increase resistance to weed dominance, and lead toward greater resilience to disturbance by increasing perennial herbaceous cover. © 2016 The Society for Range Management. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectencroachment
dc.subjectexpansion
dc.subjectfuel control
dc.subjectinfilling
dc.subjectmastication
dc.subjectresilience
dc.subjectresistance
dc.subjectsagebrush
dc.titleVegetation Response to Piñon and Juniper Tree Shredding∗
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.source.volume69
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage224
dc.source.endpage234
refterms.dateFOA2022-01-07T19:54:46Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Vegetation-Response-to-Pi-on-a ...
Size:
730.3Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record