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dc.contributor.authorFlood, Michael D.
dc.contributor.authorEggers, Erika D.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-13T01:28:30Z
dc.date.available2022-01-13T01:28:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-01
dc.identifier.citationFlood, M. D., & Eggers, E. D. (2021). Dopamine D1 and D4 receptors contribute to light adaptation in ON-sustained retinal ganglion cells. Journal of Neurophysiology.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3077
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/jn.00218.2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/662879
dc.description.abstractThe adaptation of ganglion cells to increasing light levels is a crucial property of the retina. The retina must respond to light intensities that vary by 10–12 orders of magnitude, but the dynamic range of ganglion cell responses covers only ∼3 orders of magnitude. Dopamine is a crucial neuromodulator for light adaptation and activates receptors in the D1 and D2 families. Dopamine type D1 receptors (D1Rs) are expressed on horizontal cells and some bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells. In the D2 family, D2Rs are expressed on dopaminergic amacrine cells and D4Rs are primarily expressed on photoreceptors. However, the roles of activating these receptors to modulate the synaptic properties of the inputs to ganglion cells are not yet clear. Here, we used single-cell retinal patch-clamp recordings from the mouse retina to determine how activating D1Rs and D4Rs changed the light-evoked and spontaneous excitatory inputs to ON-sustained (ON-s) ganglion cells. We found that both D1R and D4R activation decrease the light-evoked excitatory inputs to ON-s ganglion cells, but that only the sum of the peak response decrease due to activating the two receptors was similar to the effect of light adaptation to a rod-saturating background. The largest effects on spontaneous excitatory activity of both D1R and D4R agonists was on the frequency of events, suggesting that both D1Rs and D4Rs are acting upstream of the ganglion cells. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Dopamine by bright light conditions allows retinal neurons to reduce sensitivity to adapt to bright light conditions. It is not clear how and why dopamine receptors modulate retinal ganglion cell signaling. We found that both D1 and D4 dopamine receptors in photoreceptors and inner retinal neurons contribute significantly to the reduction in sensitivity of ganglion cells with light adaptation. However, light adaptation also requires dopamine-independent mechanisms that could reflect inherent sensitivity changes in photoreceptors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHHS | NIH | National Eye Instituteen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 the American Physiological Society.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectDopamineen_US
dc.subjectExcitationen_US
dc.subjectGanglion cellen_US
dc.subjectLight adaptationen_US
dc.subjectRetinaen_US
dc.titleDopamine D1 and D4 receptors contribute to light adaptation in ON-sustained retinal ganglion cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1522-1598
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Neurophysiologyen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published 07 December 2021en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1152/jn.00218.2021
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Neurophysiology
dc.source.volume126
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage2039
dc.source.endpage2052


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