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dc.contributor.authorOtter, J.
dc.contributor.authorGinsburg, A.
dc.contributor.authorBallering, N.P.
dc.contributor.authorBally, J.
dc.contributor.authorEisner, J.A.
dc.contributor.authorGoddi, C.
dc.contributor.authorPlambeck, R.
dc.contributor.authorWright, M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-17T01:56:34Z
dc.date.available2022-03-17T01:56:34Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationOtter, J., Ginsburg, A., Ballering, N. P., Bally, J., Eisner, J. A., Goddi, C., Plambeck, R., & Wright, M. (2021). Small Protoplanetary Disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster and OMC1 with ALMA. Astrophysical Journal.
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-4357/ac29c2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663539
dc.description.abstractThe Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) is the nearest dense star-forming region at ∼400 pc away, making it an ideal target to study the impact of high stellar density and proximity to massive stars (the Trapezium) on protoplanetary disk evolution. The OMC1 molecular cloud is a region of high extinction situated behind the Trapezium in which actively forming stars are shielded from the Trapezium’s strong radiation. In this work, we survey disks at high resolution with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at three wavelengths with resolutions of 0.″095 (3 mm; Band 3), 0.″048 (1.3 mm; Band 6), and 0.″030 (0.85 mm; Band 7) centered on radio Source I. We detect 127 sources, including 15 new sources that have not previously been detected at any wavelength. 72 sources are spatially resolved at 3 mm, with sizes from ∼8–100 au. We classify 76 infrared-detected sources as foreground ONC disks and the remainder as embedded OMC1 disks. The two samples have similar disk sizes, but the OMC1 sources have a dense and centrally concentrated spatial distribution, indicating they may constitute a spatially distinct subcluster. We find smaller disk sizes and a lack of large (>75 au) disks in both our samples compared to other nearby star-forming regions, indicating that environmental disk truncation processes are significant. While photoevaporation from nearby massive Trapezium stars may account for the smaller disks in the ONC, the embedded sources in OMC1 are hidden from this radiation and thus must truncated by some other mechanism, possibly dynamical truncation or accretion-driven contraction. © 2021. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Astronomical Society
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleSmall Protoplanetary Disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster and OMC1 with ALMA
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentSteward Observatory, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalAstrophysical Journal
dc.description.noteImmediate access
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleAstrophysical Journal
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-17T01:56:34Z


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