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dc.contributor.authorGarcia, D.O.
dc.contributor.authorMorrill, K.E.
dc.contributor.authorLopez-Pentecost, M.
dc.contributor.authorVillavicencio, E.A.
dc.contributor.authorVogel, R.M.
dc.contributor.authorBell, M.L.
dc.contributor.authorKlimentidis, Y.C.
dc.contributor.authorMarrero, D.G.
dc.contributor.authorThomson, C.A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-17T01:57:07Z
dc.date.available2022-03-17T01:57:07Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationGarcia, D. O., Morrill, K. E., Lopez-Pentecost, M., Villavicencio, E. A., Vogel, R. M., Bell, M. L., Klimentidis, Y. C., Marrero, D. G., & Thomson, C. A. (2022). Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Associated Risk Factors in a Community-Based Sample of Mexican-Origin Adults. Hepatology Communications.
dc.identifier.issn2471-254X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hep4.1896
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663593
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highest among Mexican-origin (MO) adults. Few studies have estimated the prevalence of NAFLD in this subpopulation, particularly by sex and age. We assessed the prevalence of NAFLD in a community sample of MO adults residing in a border region of southern Arizona and determined risk factors associated with NAFLD. A total of 307 MO adults (n = 194 women; n = 113 men) with overweight or obesity completed an in-person study visit, including vibration-controlled transient elastography (FibroScan) for the assessment of NAFLD status. A continuous attenuation parameter score of ≥288 dB/m (≥5% hepatic steatosis) indicated NAFLD status. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for NAFLD. We identified 155 participants (50%) with NAFLD, including 52% of women and 48% of men; there were no sex differences in steatosis (men, 287.8 dB/m; women, 288.4 dB/m). Sex, age, patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) risk allele carrier status, comorbidities, and cultural and behavioral variables were not associated with NAFLD status. There was some evidence for effect modification of body mass index (BMI) by sex (Pinteraction = 0.08). The estimated OR for an increase in BMI of 5 kg/m2 was 3.36 (95% CI, 1.90, 5.91) for men and 1.92 (95% CI, 1.40, 2.64) for women. In post hoc analyses treating steatosis as a continuous variable in a linear regression, significant effect modification was found for BMI by sex (Pinteraction = 0.03), age (P = 0.05), and PNPLA3 risk allele carrier status (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Lifestyle interventions to reduce body weight, with consideration of age and genetic risk status, are needed to stem the higher rates of NAFLD observed for MO populations. © 2022 The Authors. Hepatology Communications published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Inc
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 The Authors. Hepatology Communications published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs License.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleNonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Associated Risk Factors in a Community-Based Sample of Mexican-Origin Adults
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health Promotion Sciences, University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona Cancer Center
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Translational Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Arizona
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalHepatology Communications
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleHepatology Communications
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-17T01:57:07Z


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Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Hepatology Communications published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Hepatology Communications published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs License.