Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChakravarti, I.
dc.contributor.authorMiranda-Schaeubinger, M.
dc.contributor.authorRuiz-Remigio, A.
dc.contributor.authorBriones-Garduño, C.
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Figueroa, E.A.
dc.contributor.authorVillanueva-Cabello, C.C.
dc.contributor.authorBorge-Villareal, A.
dc.contributor.authorBejar-Ramírez, Y.
dc.contributor.authorPérez-González, A.
dc.contributor.authorRivera-Benitez, C.
dc.contributor.authorOren, E.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, H.E.
dc.contributor.authorBecker, I.
dc.contributor.authorGilman, R.H.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-17T01:57:15Z
dc.date.available2022-03-17T01:57:15Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationChakravarti, I., Miranda-Schaeubinger, M., Ruiz-Remigio, A., Briones-Garduño, C., Fernández-Figueroa, E. A., Villanueva-Cabello, C. C., Borge-Villareal, A., Bejar-Ramírez, Y., Pérez-González, A., Rivera-Benitez, C., Oren, E., Brown, H. E., Becker, I., & Gilman, R. H. (2022). Chagas Disease in Pregnant Women from Endemic Regions Attending the Hospital General de Mexico, Mexico City. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.
dc.identifier.issn2414-6366
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/tropicalmed7010008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663607
dc.description.abstractTrypanosoma cruzi infection leads to Chagas disease (CD), a neglected tropical infection of significant public health importance in South and Central America and other, non-endemic, countries. Pregnant women and their children are of particular importance to screen as T. cruzi can be transmitted vertically. The objective of this study was to screen for T. cruzi infection among pregnant women from endemic areas seen at the Hospital General de Mexico for prenatal care, so that they and their children may be quickly connected to CD treatment. Pregnant women were recruited through the hospital prenatal clinic and screened for T. cruzi infection using a series of serological and molecular tests. Of 150 screened patients, mean age 26.8 (SD 6.4), 30 (20.0%) were positive by at least one diagnostic test. Of these, only nine (6%) were positive as determined by PCR. Diagnosis of chronic CD is difficult in endemic places like Mexico due to the limitations of current commercially available diagnostic tests. Further evaluation of diagnostic performance of various assays could improve current CD diagnostic algorithms and proper care management in these regions. Genetic variability in the parasite may also play a role in the differing assay performances seen in this study, and this may be a valuable avenue of further research. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectChagas disease
dc.subjectChagas disease diagnosis
dc.subjectCongenital Chagas disease
dc.subjectTrypanosoma cruzi
dc.titleChagas Disease in Pregnant Women from Endemic Regions Attending the Hospital General de Mexico, Mexico City
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentMel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalTropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleTropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-17T01:57:15Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
tropicalmed-07-00008.pdf
Size:
1.352Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).