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dc.contributor.authorSchook, D.M.
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorHoover, J.D.
dc.contributor.authorRice, S.E.
dc.contributor.authorThaxton, R.D.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, D.J.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-18T00:03:38Z
dc.date.available2022-03-18T00:03:38Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationSchook, D. M., Friedman, J. M., Hoover, J. D., Rice, S. E., Thaxton, R. D., & Cooper, D. J. (2022). Riparian forest productivity decline initiated by streamflow diversion then amplified by atmospheric drought 40 years later. Ecohydrology.
dc.identifier.issn1936-0584
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/eco.2408
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663636
dc.description.abstractRiparian trees and their annual growth rings can be used to reconstruct drought histories related to streamflow. Because the death of individual trees reduces competition for survivors, however, tree-ring chronologies based only on surviving trees may underestimate drought impacts. This problem can be addressed by calculating productivity at the stand scale to account for tree mortality and establishment. In the semi-arid Great Basin in the western United States, we calculated riparian wood production from 1946 to 2016 along a stream where most flow has been removed by a diversion pipeline since 1961. The water table was found to be generally below the root zone of cottonwoods (Populus angustifolia and P. angustifolia × trichocarpa) in the pipeline-dewatered reach but within it in reference reaches. To reconstruct forest productivity through time, we separately combined measurements of tree-ring basal area increment with either changing forest area from aerial photos or a census of cross-dated living and dead cottonwoods. Both approaches revealed productivity declines in the dewatered reach relative to adjacent reference reaches, and the decline accelerated in the 2000s. Tree-ring narrowing resulted in divergence between the dewatered reach and one reference reach within 5 years after diversion. However, the dewatered reach did not diverge from the other reference reach until 40 years later, when an unprecedented early 2000s atmospheric drought coupled with diversion to cause extensive cottonwood mortality. We conclude that dendrochronological investigations of forest response to environmental stress should incorporate stand dynamics and that the full impacts of flow diversion can be delayed for decades. © 2022 The Authors. Ecohydrology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Ltd
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 The Authors. Ecohydrology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleRiparian forest productivity decline initiated by streamflow diversion then amplified by atmospheric drought 40 years later
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree Ring Research, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalEcohydrology
dc.description.noteOpen access article
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleEcohydrology
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-18T00:03:38Z


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Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Ecohydrology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Ecohydrology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License.