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dc.contributor.authorStouffer, R. J.
dc.contributor.authorRussell, J. L.
dc.contributor.authorBeadling, R. L.
dc.contributor.authorBroccoli, A. J.
dc.contributor.authorKrasting, J. P.
dc.contributor.authorMalyshev, S.
dc.contributor.authorNaiman, Z.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-18T23:30:56Z
dc.date.available2022-03-18T23:30:56Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-15
dc.identifier.citationStouffer, R. J., Russell, J. L., Beadling, R. L., Broccoli, A. J., Krasting, J. P., Malyshev, S., & Naiman, Z. (2022). The Role of Continental Topography in the Present-Day Ocean’s Mean Climate. Journal of Climate.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0894-8755
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/jcli-d-20-0690.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663683
dc.description.abstractClimate models of varying complexity have been used for decades to investigate the impact of mountains on the atmosphere and surface climate. Here, the impact of removing the continental topography on the present-day ocean climate is investigated using three different climate models spanning multiple generations. An idealized study is performed where all present-day land surface topography is removed and the equilibrium change in the oceanic mean state with and without the mountains is studied. When the mountains are removed, changes found in all three models include a weakening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and associated SST cooling in the subpolar North Atlantic. The SSTs also warm in all the models in the western North Pacific Ocean associated with a northward shift of the atmospheric jet and the Kuroshio. In the ocean interior, the magnitude of the temperature and salinity response to removing the mountains is relatively small and the sign and magnitude of the changes generally vary among the models. These different interior ocean responses are likely related to differences in the mean state of the control integrations due to differences in resolution and associated subgrid-scale mixing parameterizations. Compared to the results from 4xCO2 simulations, the interior ocean temperature changes caused by mountain removal are relatively small; however, the oceanic circulation response and Northern Hemisphere near-surface temperature changes are of a similar magnitude to the response to such radiative forcing changes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 American Meteorological Society.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectOceanen_US
dc.subjectOcean circulationen_US
dc.subjectPaleoclimateen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Continental Topography in the Present-Day Ocean’s Mean Climateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1520-0442
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geosciences, The University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Climateen_US
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 02 February 2022en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Climate
dc.source.volume35
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage1327
dc.source.endpage1346


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