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dc.contributor.authorSommers, Pacifica
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorChesson, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-25T17:50:08Z
dc.date.available2022-03-25T17:50:08Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-23
dc.identifier.citationSommers, P., Davis, A., & Chesson, P. (2022). Invasive buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) increases water stress and reduces success of native perennial seedlings in southeastern Arizona. Biological Invasions.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1387-3547
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10530-022-02750-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663787
dc.description.abstractAlthough buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) invasions on several continents have significant ecological impacts, little information is available on its stage-specific interactions with native vegetation. In areas of North America’s Sonoran Desert highly impacted by buffel grass, perennial plants are particularly vulnerable during the recruitment stage. We studied the impact of buffel grass on the emergence and early survival of native perennials that germinate during monsoon season with a field experiment. We used a pot experiment to test whether proximity to buffel grass induced water stress in the seedlings of a locally dominant native tree, the foothills palo verde (Parkinsonia microphylla). Seedlings of native perennials emerged at nearly twice the rate, and survived longer, on field plots where mature buffel grass was removed, or had never invaded, than where buffel grass remained. The stable isotope signatures of carbon in palo verde seedlings grown in pots with buffel grass indicated higher stomatal closure consistent with greater water stress than in seedlings grown alone. A stage-structured model based on palo verde population dynamics illustrates that if only recruitment rates were affected by buffel grass, palo verde would likely remain on the landscape, though at reduced densities. However, the long-lived nature of perennials implies we have yet to observe the full impacts of the invasion. The model indicates the kinds of studies needed to fully predict the impact of buffel grass.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDirectorate for Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectBuffel grassen_US
dc.subjectInvasionen_US
dc.subjectSeedlingen_US
dc.subjectSonoran Deserten_US
dc.subjectStable isotopesen_US
dc.subjectWater stressen_US
dc.titleInvasive buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) increases water stress and reduces success of native perennial seedlings in southeastern Arizonaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1573-1464
dc.contributor.departmentEcology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalBiological Invasionsen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published: 23 February 2022en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii2750
dc.source.journaltitleBiological Invasions


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