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dc.contributor.authorBourassa, Kyle J.
dc.contributor.authorSbarra, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-04T23:20:01Z
dc.date.available2022-04-04T23:20:01Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-15
dc.identifier.citationBourassa, K. J., & Sbarra, D. A. (2022). Cardiovascular reactivity, stress, and personal emotional salience: Choose your tasks carefully. Psychophysiology.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0048-5772
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/psyp.14037
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663880
dc.description.abstractBoth greater cardiovascular reactivity and lesser reactivity (“blunting”) to laboratory stressors are linked to poor health outcomes, including among people who have a history of traumatic experiences. In a sample of recently separated and divorced adults (N = 96), this study examined whether differences in cardiovascular reactivity might be explained by differences in the personal emotional salience of the tasks and trauma history. Participants were assessed for trauma history, current distress related to their marital dissolution, and cardiovascular reactivity during two tasks, a serial subtraction math stressor task and a divorce-recall task. Participants with a greater trauma history evidenced less blood pressure reactivity to the serial subtraction task (a low personal emotional salience task) when compared to participants with less trauma history. In contrast, participants with a greater trauma history evidenced higher blood pressure reactivity to the divorce-recall task, but only if they also reported more divorce-related distress (high personal emotional salience). These associations were not significant for heart rate reactivity. Among people with a history of more traumatic experiences, a task with low personal salience was associated with a lower blood pressure response, whereas a task with higher personal emotional salience was associated with a higher blood pressure response. Future studies examining cardiovascular reactivity would benefit from determining the personal emotional salience of tasks, particularly for groups that have experienced stressful life events or trauma.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Mental Healthen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rights© 2022 Society for Psychophysiological Research.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectcardiovascular reactivityen_US
dc.subjectdivorceen_US
dc.subjectemotional salienceen_US
dc.subjectheart rateen_US
dc.subjecttraumaen_US
dc.titleCardiovascular reactivity, stress, and personal emotional salience: Choose your tasks carefullyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8986
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalPsychophysiologyen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; first published: 15 March 2022en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1111/psyp.14037
dc.source.journaltitlePsychophysiology


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