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dc.contributor.authorManvelian, Atina
dc.contributor.authorFivecoat, Hayley
dc.contributor.authorMilek, Anne
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Erika
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-11T19:27:25Z
dc.date.available2022-04-11T19:27:25Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-03
dc.identifier.citationManvelian, A., Fivecoat, H., Milek, A., & Lawrence, E. (2021). Ending the silo effect: A test of the relational domain spillover model. Family Process.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-7370
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/famp.12728
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/663903
dc.description.abstractCouple interventions are limited in their effectiveness for reducing marital distress and dissolution. One explanation for this may be the narrow focus on conflict management and a limited understanding of how other domains in marriage influence one another over time. We present the first test of the relational domain spillover model (RDSM) to understand the extent to which poor functioning in either positive or negative areas of the relationship spill over into other aspects of relationship functioning across time. Husbands and wives reported annually on the quality of five relationship domains (emotional intimacy, sex, support, power/control, and conflict) over the first seven years of marriage. Longitudinal dyadic multilevel modeling techniques were used to examine how domains change over time and how earlier declines in positive areas of couple functioning predict later problems in negative areas of couple functioning and vice versa. We found support for both directions of the RDSM model. Earlier declines in sexuality and support predicted later declines in conflict, and, for wives, earlier declines in couple sexuality were linked to later control issues. Earlier declines in conflict communication and control predicted later problems with emotional intimacy. For men, longitudinal associations between sexuality and conflict, and control, were bidirectional. These findings point to the need to move toward a multi-dimensional, dynamic conceptualization of relationship functioning across time and the importance of focusing on different relational domains as targets for couple interventions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rights© 2021 Family Process Institute.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectconflicten_US
dc.subjectcontrolen_US
dc.subjectintimacyen_US
dc.subjectmarriageen_US
dc.subjectsexen_US
dc.subjectsupporten_US
dc.titleEnding the silo effect: A test of the relational domain spillover modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1545-5300
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalFamily Processen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; first published: 03 October 2021en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1111/famp.12728
dc.source.journaltitleFamily Process


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