Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFloyd, Kory
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Nathan
dc.creatorWoo, Nathan
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-21T01:40:50Z
dc.date.available2022-04-21T01:40:50Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationWoo, Nathan. (2022). Testing the Effects of an Affectionate Communication Intervention to Bolster Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664029
dc.description.abstractThis study tested the efficacy of an affectionate communication intervention to help adults living in the United States bolster their mental health during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ninety-eight married and cohabitating adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: increased affectionate communication (treatment), increased thankfulness (comparison), or no change in behavior (control). The final sample contained 73 adults (ntreatment = 26, ncomparison = 24, ncontrol = 23) who completed the four-week intervention that started in September and concluded in October 2020. Although post-hoc analyses revealed that participants in the treatment group were, on average, less affection deprived, less depressed, less lonely, and less stressed than those in the comparison and the control groups halfway through the intervention and at the end of the intervention, these findings should be interpreted with caution due to a successful comparison manipulation, but a statistically nonsignificant treatment manipulation. Speculation as to why the intervention failed to reject the null hypotheses is presented in the discussion before providing methodological recommendations for future interventions in this area of research.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectaffection exchange theory
dc.subjectaffectionate communication
dc.subjecthealth communication
dc.subjectmental health
dc.titleTesting the Effects of an Affectionate Communication Intervention to Bolster Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Dissertation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.leveldoctoral
dc.contributor.committeememberRains, Stephen A.
dc.contributor.committeememberPitts, Margaret J.
dc.contributor.committeememberHamann, Heidi A.
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2022-04-21T01:40:50Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_19507_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
1.687Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record