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dc.contributor.authorChase, E.A.
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, B.
dc.contributor.authorFryer, C.L.
dc.contributor.authorTroja, E.
dc.contributor.authorKorobkin, O.
dc.contributor.authorWollaeger, R.T.
dc.contributor.authorRistic, M.
dc.contributor.authorFontes, C.J.
dc.contributor.authorHungerford, A.L.
dc.contributor.authorHerring, A.M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-25T20:49:20Z
dc.date.available2022-04-25T20:49:20Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationChase, E. A., O’Connor, B., Fryer, C. L., Troja, E., Korobkin, O., Wollaeger, R. T., Ristic, M., Fontes, C. J., Hungerford, A. L., & Herring, A. M. (2022). Kilonova Detectability with Wide-field Instruments. Astrophysical Journal.
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-4357/ac3d25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664069
dc.description.abstractKilonovae are ultraviolet, optical, and infrared transients powered by the radioactive decay of heavy elements following a neutron star merger. Joint observations of kilonovae and gravitational waves can offer key constraints on the source of Galactic r-process enrichment, among other astrophysical topics. However, robust constraints on heavy element production require rapid kilonova detection (within ∼1 day of merger) as well as multiwavelength observations across multiple epochs. In this study, we quantify the ability of 13 wide-field-of-view instruments to detect kilonovae, leveraging a large grid of over 900 radiative transfer simulations with 54 viewing angles per simulation. We consider both current and upcoming instruments, collectively spanning the full kilonova spectrum. The Roman Space Telescope has the highest redshift reach of any instrument in the study, observing kilonovae out to z ∼1 within the first day post-merger. We demonstrate that BlackGEM, DECam, GOTO, the Vera C. Rubin Observatory's LSST, ULTRASAT, VISTA, and WINTER can observe some kilonovae out to z ∼0.1 (∼475 Mpc), while DDOTI, MeerLICHT, PRIME, Swift/UVOT, and ZTF are confined to more nearby observations. Furthermore, we provide a framework to infer kilonova ejecta properties following nondetections and explore variation in detectability with these ejecta parameters. © 2022. The Author(s). Published by the American Astronomical Society.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherIOP Publishing Ltd
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022. The Author(s). Published by the American Astronomical Society. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleKilonova Detectability with Wide-field Instruments
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalAstrophysical Journal
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleAstrophysical Journal
refterms.dateFOA2022-04-25T20:49:20Z


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Copyright © 2022. The Author(s). Published by the American Astronomical Society. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022. The Author(s). Published by the American Astronomical Society. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence.