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dc.contributor.authorGarcia, L.A.
dc.contributor.authorZapata-Bustos, R.
dc.contributor.authorDay, S.E.
dc.contributor.authorCampos, B.
dc.contributor.authorHamzaoui, Y.
dc.contributor.authorWu, L.
dc.contributor.authorLeon, A.D.
dc.contributor.authorKrentzel, J.
dc.contributor.authorColetta, R.L.
dc.contributor.authorDe Filippis, E.
dc.contributor.authorRoust, L.R.
dc.contributor.authorMandarino, L.J.
dc.contributor.authorColetta, D.K.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-25T20:51:54Z
dc.date.available2022-04-25T20:51:54Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationGarcia, L. A., Zapata-Bustos, R., Day, S. E., Campos, B., Hamzaoui, Y., Wu, L., Leon, A. D., Krentzel, J., Coletta, R. L., De Filippis, E., Roust, L. R., Mandarino, L. J., & Coletta, D. K. (2022). Can Exercise Training Alter Human Skeletal Muscle DNA Methylation? Metabolites.
dc.identifier.issn2218-1989
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/metabo12030222
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664112
dc.description.abstractSkeletal muscle is highly plastic and dynamically regulated by the body’s physical demands. This study aimed to determine the plasticity of skeletal muscle DNA methylation in response to 8 weeks of supervised exercise training in volunteers with a range of insulin sensitivities. We studied 13 sedentary participants and performed euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps with basal vastus later-alis muscle biopsies and peak aerobic activity (VO2 peak) tests before and after training. We extracted DNA from the muscle biopsies and performed global methylation using Illumina’s Methylation EPIC 850K BeadChip. Training significantly increased peak aerobic capacity and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Fasting serum insulin and insulin levels during the steady state of the clamp were significantly lower post-training. Insulin clearance rates during the clamp increased following the training. We identified 13 increased and 90 decreased differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs) in response to 8 weeks of training. Of the 13 increased DMCs, 2 were within the following genes, FSTL3, and RP11-624M8.1. Of the 90 decreased DMCs, 9 were within the genes CNGA1, FCGR2A, KIF21A, MEIS1, NT5DC1, OR4D1, PRPF4B, SLC26A7, and ZNF280C. Moreover, pathway analysis showed an enrichment in metabolic and actin-cytoskeleton pathways for the decreased DMCs, and for the increased DMCs, an enrichment in signal-dependent regulation of myogenesis, NOTCH2 activation and transmission, and SMAD2/3: SMAD4 transcriptional activity pathways. Our findings showed that 8 weeks of exercise training alters skeletal muscle DNA methylation of specific genes and pathways in people with varying degrees of insulin sensitivity. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDNA methylation
dc.subjectEuglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp
dc.subjectExercise training
dc.subjectInsulin sensitivity
dc.subjectSkeletal muscle
dc.subjectVO2 peak
dc.titleCan Exercise Training Alter Human Skeletal Muscle DNA Methylation?
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Arizona
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Disparities in Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism, University of Arizona
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiology, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalMetabolites
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleMetabolites
refterms.dateFOA2022-04-25T20:51:54Z


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Copyright © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).