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dc.contributor.authorGaither, Joshua B.
dc.contributor.authorRice, Amber D.
dc.contributor.authorJado, Isrealia
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Smita
dc.contributor.authorPackard, Samuel E.
dc.contributor.authorClark, John
dc.contributor.authorDraper, Scott
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Mike
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Brad
dc.contributor.authorSpaite, Daniel W.
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-13T21:09:50Z
dc.date.available2022-05-13T21:09:50Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-15
dc.identifier.citationGaither, J. B., Rice, A. D., Jado, I., Armstrong, S., Packard, S. E., Clark, J., Draper, S., Duncan, M., Bradley, B., & Spaite, D. W. (2022). Impact of in-Station Medication Automated Dispensing Systems on Prehospital Pain Medication Administration. Prehospital Emergency Care.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1090-3127
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10903127.2022.2045405
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664209
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Medication automatic dispensing systems (ADS) have been implemented in many settings, including fire-based EMS stations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of in-station ADSs on controlled substance administration rates and EMS response intervals. Methods: This study was a retrospective review of data from a single fire-based EMS agency. Medication administration rates and EMS response intervals were compared before ADS implementation (P1; 6/1/15 to 5/31/16) and after ADS implementation (P3; 6/1/17-5/31/19). Cases with missing data and during a one-year implementation period were excluded. Results: 4045 cases were identified in P1 and 8168 in P3. The odds of morphine or versed administration increased following ADS implementation: OR = 1.77 (95% CI: 1.53, 2.03) and OR = 1.53 (95%CI: 1.18, 2.00) respectively. There were statistically, but likely not operationally significant increases in median response interval and transport interval from P1 to P3 of 14 seconds, (p < 0.001) and 39 seconds (p < 0.001) respectively. Time at hospital for all calls decreased by more than 11 minutes for all transports, from a median of 34 minutes (IQR; 23.7, 45.5) to 22.7 minutes (IQR:18.5, 27.6) in P3, p < 0.001 and by 27.9 minutes for calls in which a controlled substance was given: P1 = 50.6 minutes (IQR: 34.6, 63.2), P3 = 22.7 minutes (IQR: 18.3, 27.4), p < 0.001. Conclusion: In this system, medication ADS implementation was associated with an increase in the rates of controlled substance administration and a decrease in the time units were at hospitals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_US
dc.rights© 2022 National Association of EMS Physicians.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleImpact of in-Station Medication Automated Dispensing Systems on Prehospital Pain Medication Administrationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1545-0066
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine-Tucson, The University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalPrehospital Emergency Careen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 15 April 2022en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1080/10903127.2022.2045405
dc.source.journaltitlePrehospital Emergency Care
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage6


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