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dc.contributor.authorAltmann, Helene M.
dc.contributor.authorKazan, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorGebara, Marie Anne
dc.contributor.authorBlumberger, Daniel M.
dc.contributor.authorKarp, Jordan F.
dc.contributor.authorLenze, Eric J.
dc.contributor.authorMulsant, Benoit H.
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Charles F.
dc.contributor.authorStahl, Sarah T.
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-13T22:12:21Z
dc.date.available2022-05-13T22:12:21Z
dc.date.issued2022-03
dc.identifier.citationAltmann, H. M., Kazan, J., Gebara, M. A., Blumberger, D. M., Karp, J. F., Lenze, E. J., Mulsant, B. H., Reynolds, C. F., & Stahl, S. T. (2022). Predicting Medication Nonadherence in Older Adults With Difficult-to-Treat Depression in the IRL-GRey Randomized Controlled Trial. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-7481
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jagp.2022.03.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664214
dc.description.abstractObjective: Nonadherence to antidepressants interferes with optimal treatment of late-life depression. This analysis examines clinical and treatment factors predicting medication nonadherence in difficult-to-treat late-life depression. Methods: Secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial of antidepressant pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder in 468 adults aged 60+ years. All participants received venlafaxine XR for 12 weeks. Nonremitters were randomized to augmentation with either aripiprazole or placebo for 12 additional weeks. Medication adherence was assessed 14 times over 24 weeks. The analyses examined sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment factors that may predict antidepressant nonadherence during early (weeks 1–6), late (weeks 7–12), and augmentation (weeks 13-–24) treatment. Results: Poor cognitive function and early response were predictive of early nonadherence. Poor cognitive function and prior nonadherence were predictive of late nonadherence. Living alone was associated with nonadherence both late and during augmentation treatment. Conclusion: Future studies should consider the role of early response and cognitive function to improve antidepressant adherence, particularly among older adults who live alone.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.rights© 2022 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectantidepressantsen_US
dc.subjectgeriatricsen_US
dc.subjectmajor depressive disorderen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trialen_US
dc.titlePredicting Medication Nonadherence in Older Adults With Difficult-to-Treat Depression in the IRL-GRey Randomized Controlled Trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published 31 March 2022en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.piiS1064748122003621
dc.source.journaltitleThe American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry


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