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dc.contributor.advisorZwinger, Lynda
dc.contributor.authorSims, Rachel
dc.creatorSims, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-18T20:53:32Z
dc.date.available2022-05-18T20:53:32Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationSims, Rachel. (2022). Doing Time: Incarceration and the Novel Form (Doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664240
dc.description.abstractLong considered a formal paradox, a formal antinomy, the form of the novel has its genesis in the conditions of incarceration and solitary confinement. Traversing distinctions of national canon, period, or era, the novel form includes a great number of novelists who have done time in prison. In Don Quixote, one of the great progenitors of the novel, Miguel de Cervantes discusses the prison as the birthplace of the novel form. From this declaration of the novel’s incarcerated origins, this study engages with novels written by novelists who have also done time. Through a consideration of John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678), Charles Dickens’s Little Dorrit (1855-1857), Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from a Dead House (1860-1862), and Jean-Paul Sartre’s Nausea (1938), this study investigates the formal, life-saving properties of the novel through the lens of incarceration and isolation. Specifically, I argue that the novel is a structural hinge—another type of antimony as a form that both anchors and moves. The novel’s hinged structure, I claim, was born out of isolation and at times the solitary confinement of novelists who have been incarcerated. Through a phenomenological and formal analysis bolstered by the works of Lisa Guenther, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Caroline Levine, Margaret Doody, and Stuart Grassian among other phenomenologists and formalist critics, I demonstrate that built into the novel’s formal genetics is a subjectivity-preserving, world-providing joint—a joint denied humans and novelists alike in solitary confinement. That the multiplicity and mutability of the novel form has, in part, come from conditions of deprivation, rigidity, and monotony is due to the disintegration incarceration and isolation have on an existent’s relationship with as well as access to the self, other intersubjects, and the world. In conditions of confined isolation, the self becomes unhinged without a worldly anchor and without hinged movement and relationality with another subjectivity. Through this deprivation and through these conditions of absence, I argue, the abundance, dexterity, and bounty of the novel form was born.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBunyan
dc.subjectDickens
dc.subjectDostoevsky
dc.subjectnovel
dc.subjectprison
dc.subjectsolitary confinement
dc.titleDoing Time: Incarceration and the Novel Form
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Dissertation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.leveldoctoral
dc.contributor.committeememberLempert, Manya
dc.contributor.committeememberLucey, Colleen
dc.description.releaseRelease after 05/03/2024
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.namePh.D.


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