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dc.contributor.advisorLofverstrom, Marcus
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Allison Renee
dc.creatorBerry, Allison Renee
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-18T20:53:35Z
dc.date.available2022-05-18T20:53:35Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationBerry, Allison Renee. (2022). Precipitation Patterns Influence on Greenland Ice Sheet Regrowth During the Last Interglacial Period: CESM2 Simulation (Master's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/664255
dc.description.abstractThe Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is highly vulnerable to climate warming. Most obvious are the threats of sea-level rise due to GrIS melting, but there are also far-reaching climate effects through complex interactions with atmospheric and oceanic circulation that control the hydroclimate in the North Atlantic. To better understand how the GrIS regrows following an extreme deglaciation event during warmer climates, we analyze a unique, transient simulation of the Last Interglacial warm period (LIG; 127 to 119 ka; thousand years before present) with the Community Earth System Model Version 2 (CESM2) that includes an interactive ice-sheet component. Although the LIG warmth is primarily attributed to high summer insolation and is therefore not a perfect analog for greenhouse gas dominated anthropogenic global warming. The lowest values of surface mass balance occur at 122 ka, when the GrIS has separated into a large northern dome and a smaller southern dome. By 120 ka, the two domes are reconnected as the ice sheet begins to regrow as the summer climate continues to cool. In the modern climate, Greenland receives most precipitation during winter months along the southeastern coast. However, in the LIG simulation, winter precipitation is reduced in this region, while summer precipitation is more abundant. This is contradictory to modern climate, as precipitation during summer months tends to be most abundant in western Greenland. Understanding the dynamics of this response is not only key for interpreting proxy-data signals in past climates but may also be important for improving predictions of storm track dynamics and water resources availability in the face of climate variability and change.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectClimate Change
dc.subjectEarth System Models
dc.subjectGreenland Ice Sheet
dc.subjectLast Interglacial
dc.titlePrecipitation Patterns Influence on Greenland Ice Sheet Regrowth During the Last Interglacial Period: CESM2 Simulation
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelmasters
dc.contributor.committeememberTierney, Jessica
dc.contributor.committeememberYin, Jianjun
dc.description.releaseRelease after 11/13/2022
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciences
thesis.degree.nameM.S.


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