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dc.contributor.authorAusthof, Erika
dc.contributor.authorBell, Melanie L.
dc.contributor.authorRiddle, Mark S.
dc.contributor.authorCatalfamo, Collin
dc.contributor.authorMcFadden, Caitlyn
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Kerry
dc.contributor.authorScallan Walter, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorPogreba-Brown, Kristen
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-05T19:31:40Z
dc.date.available2022-08-05T19:31:40Z
dc.date.issued2022-07-08
dc.identifier.citationAusthof, E., Bell, M. L., Riddle, M. S., Catalfamo, C., Mcfadden, C., Cooper, K., Scallan Walter, E., Jacobs, E., & Pogreba-Brown, K. (2022). Persisting gastrointestinal symptoms and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome following SARS-CoV-2 infection: Results from the Arizona CoVHORT. Epidemiology and Infection.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688
dc.identifier.pmid35801302
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/s0950268822001200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/665556
dc.description.abstractIn this study we aimed to examine the association between gastrointestinal (GI) symptom presence during acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and the prevalence of GI symptoms and development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). We used data from a prospective cohort and logistic regression to examine the association between GI symptom status during confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and prevalence of persistent gastrointestinal symptoms at ≥45 days. We also report the incidence of PI-IBS following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Of the 1,475 participants in this study, 33.8% (n=499) had GI symptoms during acute infection. Cases with acute GI symptoms had an odds of persisting GI symptoms 4 times higher than cases without acute GI symptoms (OR=4.29, CI: 2.45, 7.53); symptoms lasted on average 8 months following infection. Of those with persisting GI symptoms, 67% sought care for their symptoms and incident PI-IBS occurred in 3.0% (n=15) of participants. Those with acute GI symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection are likely to have similar persistent symptoms 45 days and greater. These data indicate that attention to a potential increase in related healthcare needs is warranted.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectgastrointestinalen_US
dc.subjectpost-acute sequelae of COVID-19en_US
dc.subjectpost-infectious irritable bowel syndromeen_US
dc.titlePersisting gastrointestinal symptoms and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome following SARS-CoV-2 infection: Results from the Arizona CoVHORTen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1469-4409
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatisticsen_US
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and Infectionen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.identifier.piiS0950268822001200
dc.source.journaltitleEpidemiology and Infection
dc.source.volume150
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-05T19:31:40Z


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Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).