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dc.contributor.authorYuan, T.
dc.contributor.authorSong, H.
dc.contributor.authorWood, R.
dc.contributor.authorWang, C.
dc.contributor.authorOreopoulos, L.
dc.contributor.authorPlatnick, S.E.
dc.contributor.authorVon Hippel, S.
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, K.
dc.contributor.authorLight, S.
dc.contributor.authorWilcox, E.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-25T00:52:21Z
dc.date.available2022-08-25T00:52:21Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationYuan, T., Song, H., Wood, R., Wang, C., Oreopoulos, L., Platnick, S. E., Von Hippel, S., Meyer, K., Light, S., & Wilcox, E. (2022). Global reduction in ship-tracks from sulfur regulations for shipping fuel. Science Advances, 8(29).
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.abn7988
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/665964
dc.description.abstractShip-tracks are produced by ship-emitted aerosols interacting with low clouds. Here, we apply deep learning models on satellite data to produce the first global climatology map of ship-tracks. We show that ship-tracks are at the nexus of cloud physics, maritime shipping, and fuel regulation. Our map captures major shipping lanes while missing others because of background conditions. Ship-track frequency is more than 10 times higher than a previous survey, and its interannual fluctuations reflect variations in cross-ocean trade, shipping activity, and fuel regulations. Fuel regulation can alter both detected frequency and shipping routes due to cost. The 2020 fuel regulation, together with the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, reduced ship-track frequency to its lowest level in recent decades across the globe and may have ushered in an era of low frequency. The regulation reduces the aerosol indirect forcing from ship emissions by 46% or between 0.02 and 0.27 W m-2 given its current estimates. © 2022 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleGlobal reduction in ship-tracks from sulfur regulations for shipping fuel
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalScience Advances
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleScience Advances
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-25T00:52:21Z


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Copyright © 2022 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).