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dc.contributor.authorSeeley, Saren H.
dc.contributor.authorAndrews‐Hanna, Jessica R.
dc.contributor.authorAllen, John J. B.
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Mary‐Frances
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-29T01:01:04Z
dc.date.available2022-09-29T01:01:04Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-10
dc.identifier.citationSeeley, S. H., Andrews-Hanna, J. R., Allen, J. J. B., & O’Connor, M.-F. (2022). Dwelling in prolonged grief: Resting state functional connectivity during oxytocin and placebo administration. Human Brain Mapping.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471
dc.identifier.pmid36087094
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.26071
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/666223
dc.description.abstractClinical theories of adaptation in bereavement highlight a need for flexible shifting between mental states. However, prolonged motivational salience of the deceased partner may be a complicating factor, particularly when coupled with perseverative thinking about the loss. We investigated how prolonged grief symptoms might relate to resting state functional brain network connectivity in a sample of older adults (n = 38) who experienced the death of a partner 6–36 months prior, and whether intranasal oxytocin (as a neuropeptide involved in pair-bonding) had differential effects in participants with higher prolonged grief symptoms. Higher scores on the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG) were associated with lower anticorrelation (i.e., higher functional connectivity) between the defaultretrosplenial – cingulo-operculardACC network pair. Intranasal oxytocin increased functional connectivity in the same defaultretrosplenial – cingulo-operculardACC circuit but ICG scores did not moderate effects of oxytocin, contrary to our prediction. Higher ICG scores were associated with longer dwell time in a dynamic functional connectivity state featuring positive correlations among default, frontoparietal, and cingulo-opercular networks, across both placebo and oxytocin sessions. Dwell time was not significantly affected by oxytocin, and higher prolonged grief symptoms were not associated with more variability in dynamic functional connectivity states over the scan. Results offer preliminary evidence that prolonged grief symptoms in older adults are associated with patterns of static and time-varying functional network connectivity and may specifically involve a default network-salience-related circuit that is sensitive to oxytocin.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDana Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rights© 2022 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectbereavementen_US
dc.subjectcomplicated griefen_US
dc.subjectdynamic functional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectfunctional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectoxytocinen_US
dc.subjectprolonged griefen_US
dc.subjectresting stateen_US
dc.titleDwelling in prolonged grief: Resting state functional connectivity during oxytocin and placebo administrationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1097-0193
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalHuman Brain Mappingen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1002/hbm.26071
dc.source.journaltitleHuman Brain Mapping
refterms.dateFOA2022-09-29T01:01:04Z


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© 2022 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2022 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License.