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dc.contributor.advisorHamilton, Allan
dc.contributor.authorOLSEN, SARAH ASHLEY
dc.creatorOLSEN, SARAH ASHLEY
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-17T15:47:38Z
dc.date.available2022-11-17T15:47:38Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationOLSEN, SARAH ASHLEY. (2021). GENDER AND CONVERSATIONAL INTERRUPTIONS IN CLINICAL SCENARIO-BASED SIMULATION TRAINING FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/666822
dc.description.abstractGender differences in conversational interruptions have been examined in a number of different professional areas, such as corporate and judicial settings. Previous studies on conversational interruptions show that a majority involve men interrupting women, and that these interruptions amplify the gender bias and discrimination faced by those in the workplace on a daily basis. However, there is a paucity of information reported on this subject within the field of medicine and, specifically, within undergraduate medical education. Hardly any research has explored gender and conversational interruptions amongst medical students, and between medical students and their instructors. To address this gap, University of Arizona medical students were recorded during their Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) trainings in the College of Medicine Arizona Simulation Technology and Education Center (ASTEC) for analysis of interruptions. Multiple raters watched and scored the video recordings of high-fidelity, mannequin-based simulation scenarios. A coding system for interruptions was developed to evaluate the impact of not only gender, but other potentially influential factors such as the type of interruption and status of the interrupter and interruptee. After analysis of the data collected, it was found that men interrupted women more often than women interrupted men (p<0.05), and more specifically, male students interrupted female students twice as often as the reverse (p<0.02). In regard to interruption type, there were twice as many male-student-on-female-student power interruptions than there were female-student-on-male-student power interruptions (p<0.05). These findings have interesting implications for ways to minimize conversational interruptions in medical simulation training.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectInterruption
dc.subjectConversational Interruption
dc.subjectUndergraduate Medical Education
dc.subjectGender Differences
dc.subjectGender Bias
dc.subjectGender Discrimination
dc.subjectSimulation-Based Medical Education (SBME)
dc.titleGENDER AND CONVERSATIONAL INTERRUPTIONS IN CLINICAL SCENARIO-BASED SIMULATION TRAINING FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typetext
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelbachelors
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychological Sciences
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors College
thesis.degree.nameB.S.
dc.description.noteThesis completed in 2020; student graduated in 2021.
refterms.dateFOA2022-11-17T15:47:38Z


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