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dc.contributor.authorChapman, C.R.
dc.contributor.authorWoo, N.T.
dc.contributor.authorMaluf, K.S.
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-18T22:13:58Z
dc.date.available2022-11-18T22:13:58Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationChapman, C. R., Woo, N. T., & Maluf, K. S. (2022). Preferred Communication Strategies Used by Physical Therapists in Chronic Pain Rehabilitation: A Qualitative Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis. Physical Therapy, 102(9).
dc.identifier.issn1538-6724
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ptj/pzac081
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/666885
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Lack of clarity regarding effective communication behaviors in chronic pain management is a barrier for implementing psychologically informed physical therapy approaches that rely on competent communication by physical therapist providers. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-synthesis to inform the development of a conceptual framework for preferred communication behaviors in pain rehabilitation. METHODS: Ten databases in the health and communication sciences were systematically searched for qualitative and mixed-method studies of interpersonal communication between physical therapists and adults with chronic pain. Two independent investigators extracted quotations with implicit and explicit references to communication and study characteristics following Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Methodological quality for individual studies was assessed with Critical Appraisal Skills Programme, and quality of evidence was evaluated with GRADE-CERQual. An inductive thematic synthesis was conducted by coding each quotation, developing descriptive themes, and then generating behaviorally distinct analytical themes. RESULTS: Eleven studies involving 346 participants were included. The specificity of operationalizing communication terms varied widely. Meta-synthesis identified 8 communication themes: (1) disclosure-facilitating, (2) rapport-building, (3) empathic, (4) collaborative, (5) professional accountability, (6) informative, (7) agenda-setting, and (8) meta-communication. Based on the quality of available evidence, confidence was moderate for 4 themes and low for 4 themes. CONCLUSION: This study revealed limited operationalization of communication behaviors preferred by physical therapists in chronic pain rehabilitation. A conceptual framework based on 8 communication themes identified from the literature is proposed as a preliminary paradigm to guide future research. IMPACT: This proposed evidence-based conceptual framework for preferred communication behaviors in pain rehabilitation provides a framework for clinicians to reflect on their own communication practices and will allow researchers to identify if and how specific communication behaviors impact clinical outcomes. © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESS INC
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.subjectChronic Pain
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.subjectMusculoskeletal Pain
dc.subjectPain Management
dc.subjectPatient-Centered Care
dc.subjectPhysical Therapists
dc.titlePreferred Communication Strategies Used by Physical Therapists in Chronic Pain Rehabilitation: A Qualitative Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Communication, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalPhysical therapy
dc.description.noteOpen access article
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitlePhysical therapy
refterms.dateFOA2022-11-18T22:13:59Z


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Copyright © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).