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dc.contributor.advisorKnapp, Darin
dc.contributor.authorRusso, Kiersten
dc.creatorRusso, Kiersten
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-17T04:49:37Z
dc.date.available2023-08-17T04:49:37Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationRusso, Kiersten. (2023). AN ANALYSIS OF SUICIDE TRAINING IN GRADUATE PROGRAMS ACROSS THE UNITED STATES (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/668714
dc.description.abstractDeath by suicide is a growing global epidemic. Across the world there have been increasing efforts to mitigate and implement new suicide prevention strategies with the hope of reducing suicide mortality rates. While personal and community involvement is crucial for preventing suicide, mental health professionals are at the forefront in encountering suicidal individuals. Research shows that clinicians in the mental health field are often underprepared to work with clients expressing suicidal behaviors. Within this analysis, I analyzed accredited public graduate programs across the United States to investigate where the deficit in knowledge and training emerges. A possible answer to the lack of understanding and confidence while working with suicidal clients may be inadequate or insufficient training that mental health professionals receive prior to beginning their practice. Although one of the most common accreditation programs (CACREP) states that suicide education and training is required for accreditation, only four out of 197 programs in the United States include a specific suicide prevention or education course in their curriculum. Research shows that suicide trainings and courses in suicidology increase levels of understanding, feelings of preparedness and confidence for mental health professionals working with suicidal patients. While this analysis provides insight to a clear lack of training in suicide, it also offers avenues for future research in how suicidology should be incorporated into graduate programs’ curricula. With this in mind, accreditation bodies, graduate counseling programs, and state licensure boards should take into consideration how to integrate suicide-specific courses within curricula, as the implications for future mental health professionals and the well-being of their clients is substantial.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subject
dc.titleAN ANALYSIS OF SUICIDE TRAINING IN GRADUATE PROGRAMS ACROSS THE UNITED STATES
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typetext
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelbachelors
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Science
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors College
thesis.degree.nameB.S.
refterms.dateFOA2023-08-17T04:49:37Z


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