Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDu, Yu Karen
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Mingli
dc.contributor.authorMcAvan, Andrew S
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Robert C
dc.contributor.authorEkstrom, Arne D
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-17T00:55:54Z
dc.date.available2023-11-17T00:55:54Z
dc.date.issued2023-09-30
dc.identifier.citationDu, Y. K., Liang, M., McAvan, A. S., Wilson, R. C., & Ekstrom, A. D. (2023). Frontal-midline theta and posterior alpha oscillations index early processing of spatial representations during active navigation. Cortex, 169, 65-80.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0010-9452
dc.identifier.pmid37862831
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cortex.2023.09.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/670133
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has demonstrated that humans combine multiple sources of spatial information such as self-motion and landmark cues while navigating through an environment. However, it is unclear whether this involves comparing multiple representations obtained from different sources during navigation (parallel hypothesis) or building a representation first based on self-motion cues and then combining with landmarks later (serial hypothesis). We tested these two hypotheses (parallel vs serial) in an active navigation task using wireless mobile scalp EEG recordings. Participants walked through an immersive virtual hallway with or without conflicts between self-motion and landmarks (i.e., intersections) and pointed toward the starting position of the hallway. We employed the oscillatory signals recorded during mobile wireless scalp EEG as a means of identifying when participant representations based on self-motion versus landmark cues might have first emerged. We found that path segments, including intersections present early during navigation, were more strongly associated with later pointing error, regardless of when they appeared during encoding. We also found that there was sufficient information contained within the frontal-midline theta and posterior alpha oscillatory signals in the earliest segments of navigation involving intersections to decode condition (i.e., conflicting vs not conflicting). Together, these findings suggest that intersections play a pivotal role in the early development of spatial representations, suggesting that memory representations for the geometry of walked paths likely develop early during navigation, in support of the parallel hypothesis.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMasson SpAen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2023 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectMobile EEGen_US
dc.subjectnavigationen_US
dc.subjectSpatial representationen_US
dc.subjecttheta oscillationsen_US
dc.titleFrontal-midline theta and posterior alpha oscillations index early processing of spatial representations during active navigationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1973-8102
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalCortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavioren_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; first published: 30 September 2023en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleCortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
dc.source.volume169
dc.source.beginpage65
dc.source.endpage80
dc.source.countryItaly


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
CORTEX-D-23-00245_R2.pdf
Embargo:
2024-09-30
Size:
1.401Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record