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dc.contributor.authorWeise, C.M.
dc.contributor.authorChen, K.
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y.
dc.contributor.authorDevadas, V.
dc.contributor.authorSu, Y.
dc.contributor.authorReiman, E.M.
dc.contributor.authorAlzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-24T05:45:29Z
dc.date.available2024-01-24T05:45:29Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-22
dc.identifier.citationWeise, C. M., Chen, K., Chen, Y., Devadas, V., Su, Y., & Reiman, E. M. (2022). Differential impact of body mass index and leptin on baseline and longitudinal positron emission tomography measurements of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 14.
dc.identifier.issn1663-4365
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnagi.2022.1031189
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/670727
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Several studies have suggested that greater adiposity in older adults is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) related cognitive decline, some investigators have postulated that this association may be due to the protective effects of the adipose tissue-derived hormone leptin. In this study we sought to demonstrate that higher body mass indices (BMIs) are associated with greater baseline FDG PET measurements of the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRgl), a marker of local neuronal activity, slower rCMRgl declines in research participants with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). We then sought to clarify the extent to which those relationships are attributable to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or plasma leptin concentrations. Materials and methods: We used baseline PET images from 716 73 ± 8 years-old aMCI participants from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) of whom 453 had follow up images (≥6 months; mean follow up time 3.3 years). For the leptin analyses, we used baseline CSF samples from 81 of the participants and plasma samples from 212 of the participants. Results: As predicted, higher baseline BMI was associated with greater baseline CMRgl measurements and slower declines within brain regions preferentially affected by AD. In contrast and independently of BMI, CSF, and plasma leptin concentrations were mainly related to less baseline CMRgl within mesocorticolimbic brain regions implicated in energy homeostasis. Discussion: While higher BMIs are associated with greater baseline CMRgl and slower declines in persons with aMCI, these associations appear not to be primarily attributable to leptin concentrations. Copyright © 2022 Weise, Chen, Chen, Devadas, Su and Reiman.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.
dc.rights© 2022 Weise, Chen, Chen, Devadas, Su and Reiman. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBMI
dc.subjectFDG-PET
dc.subjectleptin
dc.subjectmild cognitive impairment (MCI)
dc.subjectregional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRgl)
dc.titleDifferential impact of body mass index and leptin on baseline and longitudinal positron emission tomography measurements of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in amnestic mild cognitive impairment
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
refterms.dateFOA2024-01-24T05:45:29Z


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© 2022 Weise, Chen, Chen, Devadas, Su and Reiman. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2022 Weise, Chen, Chen, Devadas, Su and Reiman. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).