Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSkiba, Meghan B
dc.contributor.authorLind, Kimberly E
dc.contributor.authorFelion, Carlie M
dc.contributor.authorKrupnik, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorSegrin, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-28T16:45:25Z
dc.date.available2024-02-28T16:45:25Z
dc.date.issued2024-03-01
dc.identifier.citationSkiba, Meghan B. PhD, MS, MPH, RDN; Lind, Kimberly E. PhD; Felion, Carlie M. MSN, APRN, FNP-BC, PMHNP-BC, BC-ADM; Krupnik, Christopher MS; Segrin, Chris PhD. Connected Community Classification (C3): Development, Validation, and Geospatial Application for Population Health Promotion and Equity. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 30(2):p E74-E83, March/April 2024. | DOI: 10.1097/PHH.0000000000001852en_US
dc.identifier.pmid38271113
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/PHH.0000000000001852
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/671100
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT: Social determinants of health (SDOH) impact population health. Leveraging community-level strengths related to SDOH through a social infrastructure perspective can optimize health behaviors and health outcomes to promote health equity. OBJECTIVE: Our aims were to develop, validate, and apply the Connected Community Classification (C3) as comprehensive community-level measure of protective SDOH and structural factors in the Four Corners states region of the United States. DESIGN: C3 was developed using an iterative principal component analysis of publicly available data mapped to 5 SDOH domains. Regional clustering of C3 by zip code tabulation area (ZCTA) was identified using spatial autocorrelation methods. MAIN OUTCOMES: In adjusted spatial autoregressive models, we analyzed the association of C3 with high-risk health behaviors and chronic disease prevalence using publicly available data for population-level estimates of fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, obesity, smoking, alcohol use, coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetes, and cancer. RESULTS: C3 was found to be reliable and valid; a C3 value of 10 indicates communities with greater connection (high), while a value of 1 indicates communities with greater separation (low) to social infrastructure. Lower connection, as measured by C3, was significantly inversely associated with lower fruit and vegetable intake, lower physical activity, and higher rates of obesity, smoking, CHD, diabetes, and cancer. C3 was significantly positively associated with heavy alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that communities connected to social infrastructure have better population health outcomes. C3 captures protective community attributes and can be used in future applications to assist health researchers, practitioners, nonprofits, and policymakers to advance social connection and health equity in geographically diverse underserved regions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherLIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINSen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2024 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleConnected Community Classification (C3): Development, Validation, and Geospatial Application for Population Health Promotion and Equityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1550-5022
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Nursing Practice and Science Division, College of Nursing, University of Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Mining and Geological Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Communication, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of public health management and practice : JPHMPen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; first published 01 March 2024en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of public health management and practice : JPHMP
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpageE74
dc.source.endpageE83
dc.source.countryUnited States


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
C3_JPHMP_Manuscript_Repository ...
Embargo:
2025-03-01
Size:
1.226Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record