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dc.contributor.authorGnanadesikan, Gitanjali E
dc.contributor.authorCarranza, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorKing, Katherine M
dc.contributor.authorFlyer, Abigail C
dc.contributor.authorOssello, Gianna
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Paige G
dc.contributor.authorSteklis, Netzin G
dc.contributor.authorSteklis, H Dieter
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Jessica J
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorGee, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorTecot, Stacey
dc.contributor.authorMacLean, Evan L
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-20T17:33:22Z
dc.date.available2024-05-20T17:33:22Z
dc.date.issued2024-03-13
dc.identifier.citationGnanadesikan, G. E., Carranza, E., King, K. M., Flyer, A. C., Ossello, G., Smith, P. G., ... & MacLean, E. L. (2024). Glucocorticoid response to naturalistic interactions between children and dogs. Hormones and Behavior, 161, 105523.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid38484567
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yhbeh.2024.105523
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/672380
dc.description.abstractAlthough research has shown that pets appear to provide certain types of social support to children, little is known about the physiological bases of these effects, especially in naturalistic contexts. In this study, we investigated the effect of free-form interactions between children (ages 8–10 years) and dogs on salivary cortisol concentrations in both species. We further investigated the role of the child-dog relationship by comparing interactions with the child's pet dog to interactions with an unfamiliar dog or a nonsocial control condition, and modeled associations between survey measures of the human-animal bond and children's physiological responses. In both children and dogs, salivary cortisol decreased from pre- to post-interaction; the effect was strongest for children interacting with an unfamiliar dog (compared to their pet dog) and for the pet dogs (compared to the unfamiliar dog). We found minimal evidence for associations between cortisol output and behaviors coded from video, but children scoring higher on survey measures of the human-animal bond exhibited the greatest reductions in cortisol when interacting with dogs. Self-reported loneliness was not related to cortisol or the human-animal bond, but measures of both loneliness and the human-animal bond were higher among children who participated after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, relative to those who participated before the pandemic. This study builds on previous work that investigated potential stress-buffering effects of human-animal interaction during explicit stressors and demonstrates important physiological correlates of naturalistic interactions between children and dogs, similar to those that occur in daily life.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press Inc.en_US
dc.rights© 2024 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectChilden_US
dc.subjectCortisolen_US
dc.subjectDogen_US
dc.subjectHuman-animal bonden_US
dc.subjectHuman-Animal Interactionen_US
dc.subjectLonelinessen_US
dc.subjectSocial Supporten_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.titleGlucocorticoid response to naturalistic interactions between children and dogsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1095-6867
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCognitive Science Program, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Veterinary Medicine, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalHormones and behavioren_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; first published 13 March 2024en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleHormones and behavior
dc.source.volume161
dc.source.beginpage105523
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States


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