Now showing items 1-20 of 75831

    • Assessing Arizona Pharmacists’ Knowledge of and Confidence with Photosensitizing Drugs

      Spencer, Jenene; Kilgore, Megan; Throckmorton, Hannah; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: To assess Arizona pharmacists’ knowledge of and confidence with identifying and counseling about photosensitizing drugs to determine the need for further education in this subject area. Methods: A voluntary anonymous questionnaire was administered in person at the 2018 Arizona Pharmacy Association Annual Convention. Sixty of the 136 Arizona licensed pharmacists in attendance completed the questionnaire consisting of opinion, knowledge, and demographic sections. A passing grade for the knowledge section was defined as eighty percent accuracy. A score of eighty percent was chosen as the minimum passing rate based on conventionally used rules of competence. T-tests and chi-square tests were used to analyze any differences between the pass and fail groups. Main Results: There was no difference between pass and fail groups with regard to age, gender, years practicing, years spent in Arizona, and practice setting (p greater than 0.05) or with regard to their confidence with counseling about photosensitizing drugs (p greater than 0.05). Pharmacists reported feeling “mostly confident” about identifying photosensitizing drugs (n equals 33), with a range of “not at all” (n equals 2) to “very” (n equals 11) confident. Only 19 (32 percent) of the 60 pharmacists who completed the survey passed the knowledge section with a score of eighty percent or greater. Conclusions: Twice as many pharmacists did not achieve a passing score for the knowledge assessment despite most pharmacists reporting they feel “mostly confident” counseling about photosensitizing drugs. These results demonstrate a need for more education either in college curriculums or continuing education regarding photosensitizing drugs and reactions.
    • Comparing Evidence-Based Learning Methods in a Self-Care Therapeutics Classroom

      Cooley, Janet; Giblin, Lauren; Gonzales, Caitlin; Lychwick, Megan; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine how teaching using case study or role play affects the retention rate of the material being taught in the form of test scores, as well as to assess which teaching styles students prefer. Methods: This study was a dependent groups design. One group was the case study activity and the other group was the role play activity. All students received both interventions. 106 subjects participated in the study and were second year pharmacy students at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy who were enrolled in the Self Care Therapeutics course on either the Tucson or Phoenix campus. Data was collected from the final exam on the number of correct answers for topics taught using the two teaching methods. A survey was also administered during class time to record student satisfaction with the activity. The data was analyzed using a paired t-test and an alpha level of 0.05. Results: Case study questions were answered correctly on the final exam 83.7% of the time while role play questions were answered correctly 89% of the time. This produced a p-value of 0.057 with no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Case study activities scored higher in survey responses regarding student satisfaction with a statistically significant p-value of 0.027. Conclusions: In conclusion, case study and role play learning strategies did not produce statistically significant difference in test scores. Students responded significantly more positively to case study activities than role play activities.
    • Up to Date or Out of Date: Pharmacist Knowledge of Plan B Contraceptive Regulations in the United States of America

      Leal, Sandra; Daconta, Jesse; Padilla, Craig; Rosa, Lauren; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims:​ To assess pharmacists’ knowledge of emergency contraceptive (EC) regulations in a community pharmacy setting around the United States (U.S.) according to the FDA and their state. Methods: ​Authors collected every community pharmacy phone number from 15 different states by contacting each state board of pharmacy. Over 1% of pharmacies were called and the data collected included whether or not the pharmacist knew the EC laws, the gender of the pharmacist, and the ages each pharmacist responded with. Main Results: ​Out of the 308 pharmacists who completed the interview, 158 were males and 150 were females. 62.0% (98/158) of men and 59.3% (89/150) of women did not know the EC regulations. The average ages each incorrect pharmacist gave were: 18 (96/187; 51.3%), 17 (51/187; 27.3%), 16 (20/187; 10.7%), 15 (14/187; 7.5%), 14 (3/187; 1.6%), 13 (1/187; 0.53%), and 11 (1/187; 0.53%). There was no significant difference between men and women in regards to the correct answer (38.0% males vs. 40.7% women; ​X ​ 2 ​ (2, N = 308) = 0.2338, p > 0.05). Overall, 39.3% (121/308) of pharmacists knew EC regulations and 60.7% (187/308) did not. Conclusions: ​The majority of pharmacists around the U.S. are out of date when dealing with EC regulations.
    • Research-related Curriculum and its Applications in US College of Pharmacy Programs

      Slack, Marion; Cushing, Justin; Merchant, Stephen; Schapker, Allie; May, Rebecca; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: To quantify the number of PharmD programs that require completion of a research project. To describe the types of research being undertaken within PharmD programs. To compare current responses with those obtained in the last survey (2007). Methods: Collaborative effort including students and faculty at three pharmacy programs (AZ, FL and MI). Cross-sectional analysis utilizing the survey (with modifications) developed in 2007. Peer review of questions (face-validity); format included dichotomous response, multiple-choice, and open response. Qualtrics® survey distributed via email to Academic Affairs (or comparative) Dean at AACP affiliate institutions. Descriptive analyses; duplicate responses combined when possible. Project was deemed exempt by IRB. Main Results: Seventy-four programs responded (54% response rate). A total of 22 (30%) programs have a required student research project compared to 25% in 2007. Project requirements were similar among the programs requiring a project: proposal (95%), IRB application (90%), collect and analyze data (77%), prepare a written report (86%), and present findings (82%). The most common methods of collecting data were surveys (91%) and chart reviews (86%). Research related coursework was similar between programs except for research methods courses, which were 36% among programs requiring a research project, and 14% among those not requiring a project. Conclusions: The number of programs requiring student research appears to have increased since 2007. Based on the survey data, students could expect to have similar research experiences in any of the colleges requiring a research project. Most colleges provide coursework related to research.
    • Preformulation studies on trametinib and panobinostat for a prospective topical combination product for the treatment of melanoma

      Myrdal, Paul; Younis, Usir; Slack, Marion; Horn, Jonah; Patel, Sid; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: Specific Aim #1: Evaluate the stability of both pharmacologic agents in the varying conditions (pH and temperature). Our working hypothesis #1 is that both agents will degrade readily at an elevated temperature (65°C) and pH (>7). Specific Aim #2: Determine the solubility profiles of both pharmacologic agents in varying conditions (pH and solvent). Our working hypothesis #2 is that solubility of panobinostat and trametinib will be greatest at a pH <7, as well as in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) solvent. Methods: Data for quantity, solubility, and stability will be recorded for trametinib and panobinostat. 1. Standards: Stock solutions of both compounds will be repeatedly diluted into 5 concentrations in varying solvents until a quantifiable, distinct peak is present on the HPLC around 6-8 minutes. 2. Solubility: In order to test the solubility of both compounds, 1-2 mg of each drug will be put into varying solvents and buffers. If the drug is visibly in solution, 1-2 mg more of drug will be added at a time until a limit of solubility is determined. a. Trametinib: The solubility as a function of pH will be conducted at four pH values between 3.0 and 9.0, as well as with various solvents (ACN, EtOH, PEG400, and PG). Each sample will be saturated with raw drug and allowed to agitate for at least 30 min. Samples will then be visually inspected to ensure that solid drug is still in excess, then will be filtered through an RC filter. The filtrate will be diluted appropriately with distilled water and analyzed using the HPLC assay. b. Panobinostat: The solubility as a function of pH will be conducted at ten pH values between 4.0 and 10.0, as well as with various solvents (10% ACN, 10% DMSO, 10% PEG, and 100% PEG). Each sample will be saturated with raw drug and allowed to agitate for at least 30 min. Samples will then be visually inspected to ensure that solid drug is still in excess, then will be filtered through an RC filter. The filtrate will be diluted appropriately with distilled water and analyzed using the HPLC assay. 3. Stability: The stability of both agents will be tested in various conditions including temperature, pH, and solvents. Stability results will be obtained until peaks varied from that of the original determined during respective standards. a. Trametinib: The influence of pH will be studied with a citrate buffer (pH 2.0), and a borate buffer (pH 9.0). The pH will be adjusted with distilled water. b. Panobinostat: The influence of pH on the stability will be studied with a citrate buffer (pH 4.0 and 5.1), a phosphate buffer (pH 6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0), and a borate buffer (pH 9 and 10). The pH will be adjusted with NaOH or concentrated HCl. The influence of solvents will be studied with 10% ACN, 10% DMSO, 10% PEG, and 100% PEG. Main Results: 1. Panobinostat: a. Solubility – Increased solubility around pH < 6.5, and > 8.5. Intrinsic solubility seems to be around 7.4 to 7.8. Solubility in 100% PEG appears to be roughly 2750 ug/mL, while in 10% showed moderate solubility (~140 ug/mL). b. Stability – 1st order degradation is noted, with higher rates with an increase in pH for the most part. The most distinguished degradation is seen at pH 7 for this experiment. Higher temperatures (65 C) yielded faster degradation. With respect to both experimented temperatures (48 C and 65 C), pH 4 and 5.1 appeared to be most stable (see attached graphs). Stability in PEG complex was poor. c. Dermabase: Drug crystals present in both phases: Not in solution. 2. Trametinib: a. Solubility – @63 C: Not soluble in MeOH, low solubility in EtOH and PG, pH 3 solubility > 2 mg/mL, ~1.93 mg/mL in PEG, 0.73 mg/mL in ACN. Limit of quantification > 40 nanograms. b. Stability – Relatively stable in light, degrades fast a pH 9, slow at pH 2. New peak present at pH 2, degradation around 11%. c. Dermabase: Drug crystals present in both phases: Not in solution. Conclusion: 1. The two medications in combination were incompatible in solution in Dermabase. 2. Additional research will need to be completed in efforts to get these two medications to go into a solution. 3. However, time, money, and the unfortunate death of the preceptor terminated further research for this project.
    • Comparing Cytochrome P450 Variant Alleles Tested and Reported in Clinical Pharmacogenomic Testing Panels

      Leal, Sandra; Hoogervorst, Meghan; Patel, Sidhi; Pina, Joel; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: To evaluate and describe the variability in cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphisms tested by laboratories offering pharmacogenomic (PGx) genotyping panels using website information and sample reports for various genetic panels. Methods: This was a descriptive study evaluating pharmacogenomic testing company websites for cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphisms. An information extraction form was developed to assess which genetic polymorphisms for CYPs 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 3A4, and 3A5 were tested and reported for each PGx company website offering genotyping panels. Each student investigator completed an electronic copy of the extraction form for each PGx website to confirm consistency of findings. Main Results: Of the ten PGx allele panels that were reviewed, consistency varied greatly as CYP2C19 had the highest consistency frequency amongst the panels reviewed with 4 out of 11 alleles having concordance (36.4%), followed by CYP2D6 (23.7%), CYP3A5 (16.7%), CYP2C9 (12.5%) and CYP3A4 (0%). Conclusions: As the laboratories that offer PGx testing rapidly increases with the field of PGx, the consistency of reporting amongst companies is different. From the ten panels that were reviewed it can be concluded that each company is dissimilar in the alleles tested and reported. PGx testing is becoming widely used to safely personalize medication therapy for various medical disease states. Currently, the variation in testing panels make it difficult for clinicians to incorporate the results into clinical practice with confidence.
    • Economic Evaluation of FOLFIRINOX vs nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic cancer

      McBride, Ali; Abraham, Ivo; Hanson, Thomas; Komerdelj, Ivan; Fletcher, Stephanie; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: Determine if FOLFIRINOX or nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (NAB+G) has no difference in the cost per life year gained as a first line treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer. Methods: This study used a retrospective chart review. Charts were accessed via the UACC electronic health records EPIQ and Cerner. Data collected consist of demographic information, number of co-morbidities, biological markers, treatment type, treatment duration, treatment dosing, supportive care measures, hospitalizations, and patient survival. Primary outcomes were assessed based on cost per life year gained. Average monthly cost of treatment is based off of known literature values. Main Results: Patients in the FOLFIRINOX group showed higher rates of provider visits. The average number of visits was 14.3 vs 7.6 in FOLFIRINOX and NAB+G respectively (p=0.014). The cost per life year gained was $86,493 for the FOLFIRINOX group and $146,652 for the NAB+G group. Conclusions: This study determined that patients treated with FOLFIRINOX experience significantly more provider visits during the course of their treatment when compared to nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine. While the average total cost of treatment was similar, the cost per life year gained was greater in the nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine group.
    • Patterns and Predictors of Depression Treatment among Older Adults with Dementia and Depression in Ambulatory Care Settings in the United States

      Bhattacharjee, Sandipan; Sun, Chongwoo; Gobin, Philippe; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: Dementia, or neurocognitive disorder (NCD), is the deterioration of performance in mental function, and is a disease state only expected to become more prevalent in the coming decades. Depression is twice as likely to develop in this population and is also shown to increase the rate of decline in those with NCD. This study was designed to determine patterns and predictors of depression treatment in elderly dementia patients in the ambulatory care setting in the United States using the Anderson Behavioral Model (ABM) Methods: We conducted retrospective cross-sectional study design by using multiple years (2005–2015) of data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), an ongoing yearly survey administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The NAMCS uses a multistage probability design to obtain systematic random weekly samples of patients from physicians across the nation using a Patient Record Form capable of recording up to three diagnoses codes and eight prescription medications for each visit. A weighted frequency for national prevalence values was generated from our data analysis. A multivariate regression analysis was completed to determine which predisposing, enabling, and need factors were significant determinants to the nature of antidepressant treatment. Main Results: A total of 655 (un-weighted) ambulatory visits by older adults with dementia and depression were recorded by National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, or a national estimate of 14.46 million elderly patients visits with both NCD and depression. Predisposing factors such as race, age, sex, geographic region, and metro/non-metro; enabling factors such as insurance and physician specialty; and need factors such as new prescription drug, new patient, or reason for visit, or chronic disease states, were recorded. Multivariate analysis revealed gender, physician specialty, metro/non-metro, geographical region, and number of medications were significant determinants in how an elder NCD patient in the ambulatory setting receives treatment for depression. Conclusions: 62.89% of patients were treated for depression, with 61.45% of all patients receiving an antidepressant and 4.94% of patients receiving psychotherapy. Psychotherapy was utilized infrequently in this population, and SSRIs were the most common form of pharmacotherapy. This suggests this patient population is vulnerable to untreated depression and reveals a need for long-term studies investigating health outcomes in these patients.
    • Pharmacists’ Attitudes Toward Including Diagnosis or Clinical Indication on Prescriptions

      Warholak, Terri; Murata, Joseph; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: To assess Arizona pharmacists’: support for the inclusion of diagnosis or clinical indication on prescription orders; current access to diagnosis or clinical indication on prescriptions orders; perceived barriers to and/or concerns about requiring diagnosis or clinical indication on prescription orders in Arizona. Methods: This was a descriptive study with data obtained from questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of 3 recall questions from the participant’s experiences, 11 questions regarding the participant’s opinion about the topic, and 5 descriptive and demographic questions about the participant. Main Results: Participants were licensed pharmacists in the state of Arizona who attended a presentation on enhanced pharmacist clinical decision-making information at the Arizona Pharmacy Association Southwest Clinical Pharmacy Seminar. 96.3% of participants supported requiring diagnosis or clinical indication on prescription orders. They reported a mean of 25.2% of current prescription orders including a diagnosis or clinical indication. Major challenges identified in requiring diagnosis or clinical indication included potential software transmission problems, prescriber having no definitive diagnosis or clinical indication for a medication, additional prescriber time, and concerns that inclusion may result in insurers rejecting claims for off-label use. Conclusions: Most respondents supported requiring diagnosis or clinical indication on prescription orders and reported about one-fourth of prescription orders they currently receive including a diagnosis or clinical indication. Multiple perceived barriers and concerns were identified by the participants.
    • Systematic review meta analysis of adherence measures for common chronic medications used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis

      Phan, Hanna; Slack, Marion; Martin, Jennifer; Park, Haeun; Park, Sohyun; Tam, Katie; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Specific Aims: The aim of this systematic review and meta analysis is to determine the best method to measure medication adherence in cystic fibrosis patients by assessing the rates of adherence to cystic fibrosis medications using different measuring methods. Methods: Using multiple bibliographic databases (including Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane, PsychINFO, WHO, Web of Science, Scopus, and IPS) and reviewing grey literature and association websites, a systematic literature search of articles related to medication adherence in cystic fibrosis patients was conducted in February 2018. The limits applied to all articles were the English language and publication dates between 1989 to the present day. The literature screening was conducted by 3 pharmacy students, professors at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, and members of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF). The studies were assessed for quality using a abstract and data extraction screening tool. Main Results: The bibliographic database searches generated 1,955 articles, and the grey literature and association websites generated 15 articles. 1,549 of the 1,955 articles and 0 of the 15 articles met the inclusion criteria and underwent data extraction screening. Then, after the abstract screening, 42 articles were identified for eligible to proceed to data extraction. Medication adherence was measured using paper/hard copy reminder tool, pager application, mobile application, electronic device, medication container with tracking, education sessions, and medication organizer. Conclusions: In the preliminary results, seven studies were included in the meta-analysis measuring five different methods of adherence: written diary, electronic monitoring, self-report, Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) and Proportion of Days Covered (PDC). Overall, adherence measured by written diary was significantly different than all other adherence measures except MPR. Further data analysis will be conducted when the data extraction and review is completed by Cystic Fibrosis clinicians and experts.
    • Algorithm Descriptions- Astrometric and Photometry

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)
    • Algorithm Descriptions- Altimetry

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2015)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Thermal Analysis

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- TAGSAM Telemetry

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Spectral Analysis

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Spacecraft’

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2016)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Sample Site Science

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Sample Return Capsule

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2013)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Regolith Development

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)
    • Data Products and Data Product Description- Radio Science

      OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission (2018)